Published On: Tue, Jun 26th, 2012

Rum uses PET bottle instead of glass

Rum uses PET bottle instead of glass

Rum uses PET bottle instead of glass

McCormick Distilling Co. Inc., a Weston, Mo.-based manufacturer and distributor of premium spirits launches its new brand –Montego Bay Coconut Rum—with help from Amcor Rigid Plastics (, the world’s leading producer of rigid plastic packaging, who designed and produced a proprietary series of lightweight polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles. The custom PET containers in 50ml, 750ml, 1L, and 1.75L sizes helped McCormick successfully launch its new brand across 43 states in a distinctive and eye-catching package.

Already a producer of straight rum products, McCormick’s entry into the flavored rum segment required not only a great-tasting product but an equally impressive package design to attract consumers in retail stores, bars, restaurants, and other establishments, according to Vic Morrison, McCormick’s vice president of marketing.

McCormick’s design requirements not only focused on aesthetics but also functional use of the bottle by bartenders, offering ergonomic and easy-to handle features. The new PET bottle has a squat base and a sleek long neck making it easy to grab and handle. The functional design was based on earlier research from bartenders and mixologists who favored long neck bottles as a way to enhance handling and help add even greater flair and style when pouring drinks.

The PET bottle boasts a slender, sleek appearance with an eye-catching teal blue color. Most of the weight is at the bottom of the bottle and the neck rises to present a “strong stance,” according to Myles Graybill, Amcor project engineer. A smaller 28mm finish (versus typical 33mm) and a smooth wall tall finish complement the long neck design.

Overall, the bottle was designed to be rigid in order to mimic the look, strength, and robust feel of glass. At the same time, the lightweight PET container delivers significant sustainability advantages, resulting in reduced shipping and transportation costs, according to Morrison. The containers are one-sixth the weight of glass bottles, unbreakable, less wasteful, and recyclable.

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